Halo Project - June Update

Jonah and Sanjay

Jonah and Sanjay

The Halo Team has had a busy couple of months completing the Inner Halo stoat network and establishing permanent possum traplines in Careys Bay and around the Port Chalmers Peninsula (Back Beach). Halo’s ‘Host a Possum Trap’ initiative has received much interest from residents and many Trapinator possum traps have made their way into backyards. We are excited to be receiving regular reports of Kākā visiting residential properties in Careys Bay as they disperse from the Orokonui Ecosanctuary. South Island robin are also dispersing, with sightings in a number of forest fragments around Orokonui Ecosanctuary.

We have almost completed the trapping rollout across the Inner Halo! Volunteers continue to manage and service over 24 project areas (730 + traps), spanning 3900 hectares – their continued commitment and enthusiasm towards predator control is impressive. 240 mustelids (stoats, weasels and ferrets) have now been caught. Given the irreversible damage to native wildlife caused by just one of these predators, this is a significant number. A big thank you to everyone who commits their time and energy. We couldn’t do this without you.

Picturesque Rakiriri / Goat Island, part of the Halo Project’s operational area.

Picturesque Rakiriri / Goat Island, part of the Halo Project’s operational area.

Over the next few months we are looking forward to expanding our operational area and working with the local communities in Heywards Point, Long Beach and Aramoana.

At this time of year it’s really important to make sure traps are well-baited, set and checked regularly so we can knock-down predator numbers before the onset of Spring when native birds will be taking nest. If you are keen on lending a hand on Halo’s Predator Free Project, please contact us info@haloproject.org.nz / 022 026 2115.

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